Downtown Sandusky Historic Walking Tour

Home/Historic Walking Tours/Downtown Sandusky Historic Walking Tour

Feick Building

2019-09-01T10:44:53-04:00

158 - 160 East Market Street

The Feick Building, Sandusky’s tallest building (eight stories) was designed by Purcell and Feick, a Minneapolis Based architectural partnership formed by two Cornell classmates, one being Sandusky native, George Feick Jr. Continue Reading >
Feick Building2019-09-01T10:44:53-04:00

Fisher’s Hall

2018-10-08T09:32:22-04:00

163 - 165 East Water Street

Fisher’s Hall is the second large limestone building to occupy the northwest corner of East Water Street and Wayne Street. Continue Reading >
Fisher’s Hall2018-10-08T09:32:22-04:00

Frank Schnaitter Tailoring Company

2018-11-01T07:21:54-04:00

104 - 106 Columbus Avenue

The building standing at 104 and 106 Columbus Avenue was constructed for immigrants Anton Buderus and Cornelius Schnaitter who utilized the Victorian style building for their tailor shop. Continue Reading >
Frank Schnaitter Tailoring Company2018-11-01T07:21:54-04:00

Freeland T. Barney Building

2018-10-07T09:26:41-04:00

225-231 West Water Street

In 1835 Zalmon Wildman and Isaac Mills, founders of Sandusky, built three brick stores each three stories high on Water Lots 68, 69, and 70. Continue Reading >
Freeland T. Barney Building2018-10-07T09:26:41-04:00

G. A. Boeckling Building & the Cedar Point Pier

2019-06-30T07:38:30-04:00

The pier on the east side of what is now known as the Jackson Street Pier has always been known as the Cedar Point Pier.

Starting in the 1870s, it has been used for boats carrying guests to Cedar Point and then back to Sandusky. Over the decades a number of boats have used the pier. The most famous—and beloved by Sanduskians—was the steamer G.A. Boeckling. Continue Reading >
G. A. Boeckling Building & the Cedar Point Pier2019-06-30T07:38:30-04:00

Graham Drug

2018-11-01T07:31:20-04:00

102 Columbus Avenue

During the antebellum years the cluster of storefronts lining the southeastern corner of Columbus Avenue and Market Street included tailor, cobbler, milliner, and barber shops, along with a market. Today Daly’s Pub encompasses 102-112 Columbus Avenue. Continue Reading >
Graham Drug2018-11-01T07:31:20-04:00

Hinde and Dauch & Norman Hall

2020-05-22T08:38:49-04:00

Jackson Street Pier

The massive three story brown brick building to the west of the Jackson Street Pier is now the Chesapeake Lofts, home to luxury condominiums offering a splendid view of Sandusky Bay. Continue Reading >
Hinde and Dauch & Norman Hall2020-05-22T08:38:49-04:00

Hubbard’s Block

2018-10-07T09:49:37-04:00

109 - 101 West Water Street

The neighboring Hubbard’s Block was designed by the well-known architect, Sheldon Smith, whose Commercial College and School of Design occupied the third floor. Continue Reading >
Hubbard’s Block2018-10-07T09:49:37-04:00

J. C. Penney & Montgomery Ward

2019-10-02T08:25:28-04:00

To the south of Gray Drug, the two-story Colmar Building was constructed in the late 1920s for retail tenants.

On March 27-28, 1929, the J.C. Penney Company opened its first Sandusky store in part of this building, with an estimated 5,000 people attending the opening. Continue Reading >
J. C. Penney & Montgomery Ward2019-10-02T08:25:28-04:00

Jackson Street Pier with views of the Coal Docks

2019-06-22T07:38:48-04:00

Jackson Street Pier

From the seawall on Jackson Street Pier the coal docks are clearly visible to the left (NW) of the pier. Sandusky has one of the finest and best protected harbors on the Great Lakes. Continue Reading >
Jackson Street Pier with views of the Coal Docks2019-06-22T07:38:48-04:00
Go to Top