Historical Markers

/Historical Markers

Cholera Cemetery

2016-12-05T13:14:53+00:00

Adams and Harrison Streets

Like many other 19th century communities, Sandusky was not immune to epidemics of contagious diseases that occurred during this era. Unsanitary conditions were common in cities and other urban areas due to both a lack of sewer systems and limited access to pure clean water. Continue Reading >

Cholera Cemetery2016-12-05T13:14:53+00:00

Erie County Marker

2016-12-05T13:14:58+00:00

Washington Street, between Columbus Ave and Jackson Street

Erie County had its origin during the Revolutionary War when several towns on the Connecticut Coast were burned by the British. Continue Reading >

Erie County Marker2016-12-05T13:14:58+00:00

Follett House

2016-12-05T13:14:58+00:00

404 Wayne Street

Oran Follett, who was the publisher of the Lincoln-Douglas Debates, resided at 404 Wayne Street. Eliza, Oran’s second wife, was very sympathetic to escaping slaves. Continue Reading >

Follett House2016-12-05T13:14:58+00:00

Hinde and Dauch & Norman Hall

2018-10-08T07:33:47+00:00

Jackson Street Pier

The massive three story brown brick building to the west of the Jackson Street Pier is now the Chesapeake Lofts, home to luxury condominiums offering a splendid view of Sandusky Bay. Continue Reading >

Hinde and Dauch & Norman Hall2018-10-08T07:33:47+00:00

Jay Cooke’s Birthplace Marker

2016-12-05T13:14:53+00:00

Northeast corner of Columbus Avenue and East Market Street

A marker on the north side of the Cooke Building which faces East Market Street marks the location where Jay Cooke, Civil War financier and developer of the Northern Pacific Railroad was born on August 10, 1821. Continue Reading >

Jay Cooke’s Birthplace Marker2016-12-05T13:14:53+00:00

Johnson’s Island Historical Marker

2018-10-08T07:51:06+00:00

Jackson Street Pier Entrance

Also at the entrance to the Jackson Street Pier is an historical marker providing information on Johnson’s Island and its Confederate Prison. Continue Reading >

Johnson’s Island Historical Marker2018-10-08T07:51:06+00:00

Jury of Erie County Women Marker

2016-12-05T13:14:57+00:00

323 Columbus Avenue

One of the first Common Pleas Court juries to be composed of women in the United States was impaneled in Erie County on August 26, 1920, the day Tennessee became the last state necessary to ratify the nineteenth amendment to the United States which provided equal suffrage for women. Continue Reading >

Jury of Erie County Women Marker2016-12-05T13:14:57+00:00